Friday, August 10th, 2018 3:56 pm

August 2018 Newsletter Highlights

Conversations with Diego Rivera launches in Dallas


Important Upcoming Events


Author Presentations

Collected Works Bookstore to Celebrate Conversations with Diego Rivera

September 13, Santa Fe: Conversations with Diego Rivera launch event at the Collected Works Bookstore. Hear intimate stories about the book’s late author Alfredo Cardona Peña and late translator Alvaro Cardona-Hine from Barbara Cardona, who wrote the afterword. Santa Fe’s Poet Laureate Emerita, Joan Logghe, will read selections from the historic 1949–1950 interviews between Alfredo and Diego Rivera.
Program: 6:30–8:00 pm. Free and open to the public.

Mara Mintzer at the Partners in Prevention Conference

September 26, Arlington, TX: Mara Mintzer, coauthor of Placemaking with Children and Youth and Director of Growing Up Bou
lder, will be delivering a keynote address, signing her new book, and leading a workshop session at the 18th Annual Partners in Prevention Conference hosted by DFPS Prevention & Early Intervention Division.
12:30–1:30 pm: Mara’s keynote address
1:45–2:45 pm: signing Placemaking with Children and Youth at the exhibit table
3:45–5 pm: workshop with Mara

NYU Press Event

American Sociological Association Meeting

August 11–14, Philadelphia: Visit New Village Press’ distributor, NYU Press, at the American Sociological Association conference! NYU Press’ exhibit table will display some of our books that exemplify this year’s theme: Feeling Race: An Invitation to Explore Racialized Emotions.


Get Ready for Our Fall Titles!

Releasing this September – Placemaking with Children and Youth: Participatory Practices for Planning Sustainable Communities

A comprehensive illustrated guidebook for engaging children and youth in the process of designing their communities

By Victoria Derr, Louise Chawla, and Mara Mintzer

In addition to a history of children’s rights and case studies from around the world of initiatives that aim to create child-friendly cities, Placemaking with Children and Youth offers detailed practical guidance in how to engage children and youth in the planning and design of local environments. This illustrated 400-page guidebook not only explains the importance of children’s active participation in their societies it presents step-by-step methodology for involving multiple generations in the planning of communities with a high quality of life for people of all ages.

This wonderful book recognizes that sustainable development calls for highly participatory local communities, including children and youth, who can cooperatively plan for and flexibly respond to environmental change. Based on this engaged view of citizenship, it offers a comprehensive range of practical methods for everyone who would like to better involve young people in this effort.
~Roger Hart, Professor, Psychology and Environmental Studies, Graduate Center, CUNY

Citizen artists revitalize place, celebrate culture, and inspire social change

Edited by Lynne Elizabeth and Suzanne Young

Releasing in September

With revised resources throughout the text, this richly-illustrated compendium of multicultural human-interest stories depicts an intersection of creativity and sense of place that introduces the field of community-based arts. The detailed profiles of nine diverse grassroots projects and their founders in Works of Heart will inspire and inform both community development professionals and citizen activists.

Community building is not just about housing, although we are doing that.
It’s not just about gardens, but that’s an important backbone.
It’s not just about education.
It’s all of that,
but we must remember the heart.
~Lily Yeh, founder, The Village of Arts and Humanities, Philadelphia

Media News

Carl Anthony’s memoir is reviewed in the African and Black Diaspora Journal

The Earth, the City, and the Hidden Narrative of Race documents an extraordinary journey of passion, learning, and an unrelenting fight for social justice… The earth and its people are inextricably intertwined; the fight for ecological
sustaina
bility cannot be won without a serious reckoning with racism, past and present. In spite of the gravity of its subject matter, The Earth, the City and the Hidden Narrative of Race… combines acute political analysis with a zeal for change and improvement.”
~Nivi Manchanda

Acting Together reviewed in the Comparative Drama Journal

The Comparative Drama Journal published a beautiful and complex review of the Acting Together: Performance and the Creative Transformation of Conflict two-volume anthology, which includes: Acting Together I: Resistance and Reconciliation in Regions of Violence and Acting Together II: Building Just and Inclusive Communities. The full review can be read here.

 

The authors wrestle in one way or another with the reality that peace itself is a loaded and sometimes even oppressive term, harnessed to squelch unrest and struggles for justice.The performances documented are inspiring. They attest 
to the potential of performance to honor, (re)member, critique, (re)generate, transform, and confront. As the performance processes recorded here reveal, conflicts demand responses as specific and layered as the beings whose bodies are (and have been) so achingly at stake.

~Kelly Howe

Saskia Sassen in Australia

Saskia Sassen, contributor to Beyond Zucotti Park and What We See, was a keynote speaker at the Melbourne Living Cities forum event on July 26 and spoke about the importance of exploring the design and economy of cities.
Why does all of this matter? The city is one of the few places where those without power have the opportunity to make a history and a culture.
~Saskia Sassen
The following day, Dr. Sassen attended the Housing Futures Conference in Sydney and spoke about how cities are complex, incomplete systems that are constantly changing—and about how to make them environmentally sustainable.

 


 

Looking Ahead

October 4, 7:30 pm, Boulder: Boulder Book Store will host a launch event for Placemaking with Children and Youth with authors Mara Mintzer and Louise Chawla. The two authors will discuss themes from this extraordinary guidebook as well as sign copies and read chapter excerpts. The $5 entrance fee for the event can go towards a copy of the new book. We hope to see you there!
October 8–9, Chicago: New Village looks forward to showcasing books at the Imagining America National Gathering. This year’s conference aims to imagine “a world beyond incarceration” and address a way to redirect carceral funds to housing, public education, and health care.

October 9-13, Spokane: North American Association for Environmental Education
Louise Chawla, coauthor of Placemaking with Children and Youth, will be participating in two group events and signing copies of her new book at a reserved book table and a poster session. This year’s conference theme is EE: A Force for the Future.
Victoria Derr, lead author of Placemaking with Children and Youth, will be hosting a session about Embedding Global Learning and Engagement in Institutional Missions and Campus-Wide Reforms. Derr will show how environmental studies courses can promote cultural inclusion and progressive planning with local communities.
November 1–3, Albuquerque: Come visit the New Village Press book table at Culture Shift 2018! Culture Shift incites “creativity and social imagination to shape a culture of empathy, equity, and belonging.” This year’s conference hopes to gather together a community that will fight for cultural healing and democracy. Register or apply to present now!

July 2018 Newsletter Highlights

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2018 3:40 pm

New Book in bookstores July 9th!

Conversations with Diego Rivera: The Monster in His Labyrinth

A year of weekly interviews, 1949-1950

by Alfredo Cardona-Peña

Every Sunday for a year, Alfredo Cardona Peña sat with Diego Rivera in the artist’s San Angelín studio, where they discussed Rivera’s feelings about the elitist aspect of paintings in museums, his motivations to create public art for the people, and his memorable, unedited expositions on the art, culture, and politics of Mexico.

These historic interviews take the reader on a journey through the mind of one of the most influential and provocative Mexican artists. This work is a unique resource for a deeper understanding of Diego Rivera’s motivations and world view, and is fundamental to researchers of Mexican art and Rivera’s effect on politics and society in the twentieth century.

For the first time, this extraordinary and rare exchange has been translated into English by Alfredo’s half-brother: poet Alvaro Cardona-Hine.

“If art is not made, there is a danger of death,” Diego Rivera tells us in this splendid book, which is itself a powerful argument for life, and for the kinds of vital, authentic art without which fully human lives are impossible.
~Ben Fountain, author of Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk
“Alfredo Cardona Peña rightly captures in this book the sarcasm, knowledge, wisdom and ingenuity anecdotes and experiences of Diego’s artistic, intellectual and political life in Mexico and the world.”
~Rina Lazo, painter and last living student of Diego Rivera

Celebrate the launch with Una Tertulia in Dallas

Learn how Diego Rivera’s views of the world, art, and politics are relevant today!

Teatro Dallas and New Village Press are cohosting a unique cultural event at The Wild Detectives Bookstore & Bar for the launch of Conversations with Diego Rivera. The evening will feature dramatic readings from the book by Teatro Dallas actors, discussion with the late author’s daughter Cora Cardona, granddaughter Sara Cardona, and writer Ben Fountain. Artist Rina Lazo, Rivera’s last living student, who overheard many of these famous interviews in Rivera’s studio will be an honored guest, as well as artist Barbara Cardona, widow of the book’s translator, Alvaro Cardona-Hine.

The Tertulia will also feature live music and an original ¡Órale Diego! cocktail. Program: 7:30–9:00 pm. Free and open to the public.


More July Events

Big History Association Conference

July 26–29, Villanova, PA: The International Big History Association strives to understand the interconnectedness of humanity and the earth. This fourth biennial conference will present on the theme: “Big History, Big Future: A Cosmic Perspective.” Carl Anthony, author of The Earth, the City, and the Hidden Narrative of Race, and Paloma Pavel, author of Random Kindness and Senseless Acts of Beauty, will be presenting the experience of African Americans and African diaspora communities in today’s world.

Teach Art for Social Change

Mat Schwarzman, coauthor of Beginner’s Guide to Community-Based Arts has designed an online course for middle and high school teachers on how to implement art in the classroom to use as a force for social change. Hosted by Xavier University, the course begins on October 3.

Register now before the July 31 priority deadline!


Media News

Sabra Moore in The Women’s Art Journal

The summer 2018 issue of Women’s Art Journal praises Sabra Moore’s Openings: A Memoir from the Women’s Art Movement, New York City 1970–1992 as a fascinating blend of the historical and personal.
Openings is a thoughtful text that has filled a large gap in the telling of women’s art history and looks to inspire us all to think carefully about our own histories and stories and their place in the future.
~Gabrielle Warner

Displacement as the New Segregation

First it was bus seats, now it is homes.

On June 19, or “Juneteenth,” Ronald Shiffman, coauthor of Building TogetherBeyond Zucot
ti Park, and What We See, delivered a poignant statement about the displacement of minorities saying, “fifty-three years after Montgomery we use the same principle of racial segregation in a sophisticated way to sort out and segregate our society—not in buses but in our neighborhoods.”

Click here to read an extended post on our blog!

Colorlines’ Summer Must-Reads

Colorlines shared their Summer Book Roundup, an annual list intended to deepen understanding of the current political climate and how to fight back. Homeboy Came to Orange was featured as one of the “must-reads” of the summer in the activism category thanks to Ernest Thompson’s inspiring journey “to fight for labor rights and racial justice.

ioby Summer Party

During ioby’s 10th anniversary celebration, they honored early project leader Mindy Thompson Fullilove, author of Root Shock and Urban Alchemy, for her work. She spoke later, “When a community is able to get together and advocate for a neighborhood, great things happen.”

ioby believes that it should be easy to make meaningful change “in our backyards” – the positive opposite of NIMBY. They mobilize neighbors who have good ideas to become powerful citizen leaders who plan, fund and make positive change in their own neighborhoods.


Mindy Fullilove’s Summer Reading List

Understanding and Overcoming Slavery’s Legacy of Inequality

Mindy Thompson Fullilove, author and community activist, recommended a summer reading list to prepare for the upcoming 400th anniversary of division in American society. On that list are three books that define our history and provide a groundwork on which to build our future:


 

Looking Ahead: Upcoming September Books

Placemaking with Children and Youth: Participatory Practices for Planning Sustainable Communities

A comprehensive illustrated guidebook for engaging children and youth in the process of designing their communities

by Victoria Derr, Louise Chawla, and Mara Mintzer

From a history of children’s rights to case studies discussing international initiatives that aim to create child-friendly cities, Placemaking with Children and Youth offers detailed practical guidance in how to engage children and youth in the planning and design of local environments. It explains the importance of children’s active participation in their societies and presents ways to bring all generations together to plan cities with a high quality of life for people of all ages.

First Time in Paperback –Works of Heart: Building Village Through the Arts

Citizen artists revitalize place, celebrate culture, and inspire social change

Edited by Lynne Elizabeth and Suzanne Young

With revised resources throughout the text, this richly-illustrated compendium of multicultural human-interest stories depicts an intersection of creativity and sense of place that offers an introduction to the field of community-based arts. The detailed profiles of nine diverse grassroots projects and their founders in Works of Heart will inspire and inform both community development professionals and citizen activists.


June 2018 Newsletter Highlights

Wednesday, June 13th, 2018 1:15 pm

Author Presentations

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The Chasm and the Prism: Deploying Magic Strategies in the Sorted-Out City

June 9, New Haven: Along with colleagues Molly Rose Kaufman and Aubrey Murdock, author Mindy Thompson Fullilove, MD, will examine urban divides caused by serial forced displacement and discuss ways to help restore the urban ecosystem. Free public event at International Festival of Art and Ideas; Yale University Art Gallery.

 

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Sabra Moore to present to the Literary Society of Taos

June 15, Taos: Author, activist, and artist Sabra Moore will read selections from Openings: A Memoir from the Women’s Art Movement, New York City 1970-1992, at SOMOS, The Literary Society of Taos, an organization that encourages the literary arts “because words can change worlds.”

Moore’s intricate memoir chronicles her interactions with other women artists to create politically and personally meaningful artworks, exhibitions, and protests in response to war, government corruption, and racial tensions.
The issues in my book—visibility of women artists, equity, reproductive rights, the need for
multiple voices—continue to reverberate and are once again current. These issues haven’t gone away. 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 ~Sabra Moore

 


Upcoming Book Release and Launch Event

Releasing in June! Conversations with Diego Rivera: The Monster in his Labyrinth

Diego Rivera CoverA year of weekly interviews, 1949-1950 by Alfredo Cardona-Peña.

For the first time, this extraordinary and rare exchange has been translated into English. These weekly intimate Sunday dialogues with what is surely the most influential Mexican artist of the twentieth century depict the free-flowing mind of a man who was a legend in his own time. In his San Angelín studio, Diego Rivera discloses his feelings about the elitist aspect of paintings in museums, his motivations to create public art for the people, and his memorable, unedited expositions on the art, culture, and politics of Mexico.

Darkness and lightning bolts inhabited [Rivera’s] soul, larger than life passion, thick as jungle vines, tenderness, unconformities and revelations.
~ Alfredo Cardona-Peña, 1949

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Una Tertulia in Dallas on July 9

Teatro Dallas and New Village Press are cohosting a unique cultural event at The Wild Detectives Bookstore & Bar in Dallas for the launch of Conversations with Diego Rivera: The Monster in His Labyrinth. The evening will feature dramatic readings from the book by Teatro Dallas actors Omar Padilla and Armando Monsivais, followed by a moderated discussion with the late author’s daughter Cora Cardona and granddaughter Sara Cardona, with input from award-winning writer Ben Fountain and New Village Press director Lynne Elizabeth
The Wild Detectives will be mixing a special ¡Órale Diego! cocktail, and the Tertulia will also feature Mexican music from Diego Rivera’s era. Program: 7:30–9:00 pm. Free and open to the public.

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New Village Press Book Tables

Left Forum

June 1-3, New York City: New Village Press exhibited at the Left Forum together with Urban Research Books, founded by Michael Sorkin. Author Tom Angotti (center), coauthor of Service-Learning in Design and Planning and coeditor of Zoned Out!, signed books at our table.

Association for Community Design

June 8–9, Baltimore: New Village looks forward to showcasing books at the Association for Community Design Conference in Reverberations, which aims to examine “the roots and relevance of community design” as well as ways to break down the structures that facilitate inequality.


Mindy Fullilove and Sabra Moore in the Media

Climate Change Workshop

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Mindy Thompson Fullilove discussed the effect of climate change on community health on May 11, 2018. The Franklin Institute’s Climate & Urban Systems Partnership (CUSP) co-hosted the workshop with The Delaware Estuary Partnership in order to promote awareness in the Philadelphia community about climate change and its impact.

There is no “their,” no “them.” Ecosystems include everybody and everything.

~ Mindy Fullilove

Disrupting the Ecology of Inequality

The New School faculty interviewed Professor Mindy Fullilove about her views on our society and the importance of history in carving out our future. With questions discussing urban renewal and the upcoming 400th anniversary of slavery, Professor Fullilove provides guidelines on how to be involved in changing the current social climate.

When you read the history there’s plenty of data on inequality and then you can see how it carries forward now… We actually haven’t gotten rid of inequality even if Black people don’t have to sit at the back of the bus.~ Mindy Fullilove

Orange City Council Commendation

Mindy received an award from the Orange City Council in honor of Women’s History Month and the publication of the second edition of Homeboy Came to Orange: A Story of People’s Power, which she co-authored with her father, Ernest Thompson.

Main Streets: A Public Space

In the current issue, No. 26, of A Public Space, Mindy Fullilove, urban psychiatrist and author of Urban Alchemy and Root Shock, discusses her study of main streets and their importance to mental health and happiness.

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The Courage of Women Artists

Margaret Randall, in a new review of Ninth Street Woman by Mary Gabriel for The Women’s Review of Books, notes the importance of women artists and their role in society. Randall compares Gabriel’s set of biographies to Sabra Moore’s Openings: A Memoir from the Women’s Art Movement, New York City 1970–1992, and recommends reading both books to gain an understanding of the brave pathways women artists have made in the United States.

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Looking Ahead

ioby Summer Party

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June 27, Brooklyn: ioby will host a summer party and fundraiser to celebrate the 10th anniversary of their work in making environmentally sustainable communities. Mindy Fullilove, an early ioby project leader, will be honored for her work along with contemporaries Eric Eddings and Laura Hansen.

International Big History Association Conference

July 26–29, Villanova, PA: The International Big History Association strives to understand the interconnectedness of humanity and the earth. T

his fourth biennial conference will present on the theme: “Big History, Big Future: A Cosmic Perspective.” Carl Anthony, author of The Earth, the City, and the Hidden Narrative of Race, and Paloma Pavel, author of Random Kindness and Senseless Acts of Beauty, will be presenting the experience of African Americans and African diaspora communities in today’s world.

Tech Art for Social Change

Mat Schwarzman, coauthor of Beginner’s Guide to Community-Based Arts has designed an online professional development course for middle and high school teachers on how to implement art in the classroom to use as a force for social change. Hosted by Xavier University.

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ADPSR speakers at AIA National Conference

Board members of Architects Designers Planners for Social Responsibility (ADPSR), the parent organization of New Village Press, will present at the upcoming American Institute of Architects’ A’18 Conference, “Blueprint for Better Cities” in New York City.

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Ethics & Practice in the New Urban Agenda Era

June 22 at 7:00 am: Raphael Sperry, president of ADPSR, and Philip Allsopp, president of RIBA-USA, will discuss the role of architects in reshaping cities to address inequality and sustainability while still preserving historical heritage and cultural identity.

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June 23 at 1:35 pm: Deanna Van Buren, ADPSR board member and Design Director of Designing Justice Designing Spaces, will be a panel discussant about the integration of social impact work and local community engagement in the workplace.

 

May 2018 Newsletter Highlights

Friday, June 1st, 2018 4:59 pm

Homeboy Came to Orange launches in Orange

The people’s University of Orange celebrated the new edition of Homeboy Came to Orange at their Placemaking 10 launch event (see recap videos!) that featured talks from urban activists and a dance performance choreographed by Artist/Urbanist in Residence, Havanna Fisher.

And what a wow launch it was! Standing room only. Fabulous jazz combo with Mindy’s brother Josh, Havanna’s dancers in gossamer and cotton performing their original Birth of a Workforce, rapper Ray Sykes, and heartfelt stories and commentary from people in the Orange community whose parents had worked with Ernie Thompson, or who knew The People’s struggle in some intimate way. Most moving was Mindy herself, last of the presenters, telling us, with pauses to regain her voice, what it had been like as a spoiled (her word) 19-year-old in 1971 helping her father put his experiences as a community activist into words. A six-month ordeal. She didn’t then understand her dad’s work or the importance of coalition building. His health was on the verge of collapse, and, in fact, he died the day after the manuscript was completed. It was five years before Mindy and her mother Maggie Thompson could bring themselves to publish the original edition.

Now, explained Mindy, her father’s message is needed more than ever to help people find their own power. She is grateful to be holding this new edition, not only personally, but for everyone who is organizing for freedom and equality.

Cake was cut, but this was not just a book party, this was real community building.

New Release! Homeboy Came to Orange: A Story of People’s PowerhomeboyCover

Personal narrative of a union organizer who helped a Jim Crow city become a more equitable place.

This lively, illustrated memoir of Ernest “Home” Thompson (1906-1971) shows the great contribution that people’s coalitions can make to building equality and freedom. Thompson’s attention to ending racial gerrymandering that segregated schools in Orange, New Jersey, also helped shape a more vibrant and accepting community and contributed to the civil rights movement nationwide.

Only the people can be entrusted with their own future.
~ Ernie Thompson, 1971

Praise for Homeboy

A Stirring Story of Building Grassroots Power

Randy Shaw, editor in chief of Beyond Chron: The Voice of the Restpraises Homeboy Came to Orange and Ernest Thompson’s work as a social justice organizer. Shaw notes the necessity of books that emphasize the importance of African Americans overcoming urban racism in the current political climate: “At a time where cynicism about government prevails, the tale of Homeboy will leave you even more inspired to work for social change.”

Mindy Fullilove Across America

A Leader for Better Health

Mindy Thompson Fullilove, MD, was recently featured in the “Meet the Leaders for Better Health” of the 2018 Annual Message by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. One of the foundation’s guiding principles is speaking out to guide change. Mindy was selected for her commitment to lead the change she hopes to see in the world.

By realizing our interconnectedness we can really create a nation of healthy people.
~ Mindy Thompson Fullilove

Rx for Healthy Communities

Mindy Fullilove delivered a lecture at the University of Missouri, Kansas City on April 19 which honored the late Father Norman F. Rotert. She discussed community themes from her previous two books, Urban Alchemy and Root Shock, and noted that, in order for cities to thrive, they must first stop “compulsive self mutilation.”

Word Up Book Talk

On April 21, Mindy visited the Word Up Community Bookshop in New York to discuss the effects of displacement in communities. As explained in her book, Root Shock, the disruption of black communities ruins economic health and strips away displaced residents’ sense of place.

#StandAgainstRacism

At a YWCA event in New Britain, Connecticut, on April 26, to discuss issues and barriers important to communities of color, Dr. Mindy Fullilove challenged her millennial audience to provide their perspective on the intersection of health disparities and urban development. Her talk inspired attendees to think about healing “the trauma of urban renewal.”

Carl Anthony and Paloma Pavel

Debra Friedman Memorial Lecture
Carl Anthony, author of The Earth, the City, and the Hidden Narrative of Race presented the 2018 Debra Friedman Memorial Lecture at the University of Washington, Tacoma, on April 26. Here is a video of his entire talk!The day following his talk, he visited Professor Fern Tiger’s classroom and captivated students with discussions about the early days of the Black Panthers and the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee.

Random Kindness Community Resilience Project

Paloma Pavel, coauthor of Random Kindness and Senseless Acts of Beauty, visited YES! Magazine with Carl Anthony to present the 4th annual Random Kindness Community Resilience Leadership Award to the staff and founders of Yes!The award is part of project to inspire community engagement and honor leaders who embody the principles of Random Kindness.

 

Releasing in June! Conversations with Diego Rivera: The Monster in his Labyrinth

A year of weekly interviews, 1949-1950 by Alfredo Cardona-Peña.

For the first time, this extraordinary and rare exchange has been translated into English. These weekly intimate Sunday dialogues with what is surely the most influential Mexican artist of the twentieth century depict the free-flowing mind of a man who was a legend in his own time. In his San Angelín studio, Diego Rivera discloses his feelings about the elitist aspect of paintings in museums, his motivations to create public art for the people, and his memorable, unedited expositions on the art, culture, and politics of Mexico.

Darkness and lightning bolts inhabited [Rivera’s] soul, larger than life passions, thick as jungle vines, tenderness, unconformities and revelations.
~ Alfredo Cardona-Peña, 1949

New Village Press Book Tables

Left Forum

June 1–3: New Village Press will share a book table at the Left Forum Conference in New York City with Urban Research Books, founded by Michael Sorkin. The Left Forum “challenges society to build a process for collaborative and emancipatory leadership.” This year’s conference aims to develop a winning strategy for the left by building a strong and unified force.

Association for Community Design

June 8–9: We will be attending and bookselling at the Association for Community Design Conference in Baltimore, Reverberations, which aims to examine “the roots and relevance of community design” as well as ways to break down the structures that facilitate inequality.

Upcoming Author Events

The Chasm and the Prism

June 9: Along with colleagues Molly Rose Kaufman and Aubrey Murdock, Mindy Fullilove will be examining the urban divides at Yale University Art Gallery. The discussion will present new ways to restore the urban ecosystem.

Openings Reading at SOMOS

June 15: Sabra Moore, New Village artist and author will be reading selected works from Openings: A Memoir from the Women’s Art Movement, New York City 1970-1992, at SOMOS, The Literary Society of Taos who strongly believe in encouraging the literary arts “because words can change worlds.” Moore will feature stories about her and other artists’ residency experiences at the Wurlitzer Foundation based in Taos, New Mexico, while showcasing images from the Women’s Art Movement.

The issues in my book–visibility of women artists, equity, reproductive rights, the need for multiple voices–continue to reverberate and are once again current. These issues haven’t gone away. 
~Sabra Moore

International Big History Association

July 26–29: New Village Press authors Carl Anthony and Paloma Pavel will present at the 2018 IBHA conference in Villanova, PA. The International Big History Association strives to understand the interconnectedness of humanity and the earth. This fourth biennial conference will present on the theme: “Big History, Big Future: A Cosmic Perspective.”

Conversations with Diego Rivera Book Launch in Dallas

July 9The Wild Detectives Bookstore and Bar (!) will be hosting a tertulia for the launch of Conversations with Diego Rivera. The event will include dramatic readings from the book, music, and a specialty “Rivera” cocktail.

Teach Art for Social Change

Mat Schwarzman, coauthor of Beginner’s Guide to Community Based Arts has designed an online program for middle and high school teachers on how to implement art in the classroom to use as a force for social change. Hosted by Xavier University.

Register now!

New Village Backlist Now Available in eBook Format

We are excited to announce that the following titles are newly available in digital ebook format through our distributor NYU Press.

  • Acting Together: Performance and the Creative Transformation of Conflict, Volumes I and II
  • American Tensions: Literature of Identity and the Search for Social Justice
  • Art and Upheaval: Artists on the World’s Frontlines
  • Beginner’s Guide to Community-Based Arts, 2nd Edition
  • Random Kindness and Senseless Acts of Beauty
  • Undoing the Silence
  • What We See

April 2018 Newsletter Highlights

Monday, April 9th, 2018 8:25 pm

New Book Release! Homeboy Came to Orange: A Story of People’s Power

Personal narrative of a union organizer who helped a Jim Crow city become a more equitable place. This lively, illustrated memoir of Ernest “Home” Thompson (1906-1971) shows the great contribution that people’s coalitions can make to building equality and freedom. Thompson’s attention to ending racial gerrymandering that segregated schools in Orange, New Jersey, also helped shape a more vibrant and accepting community and contributed to the civil rights movement nationwide.

Launch Event

Saturday, April 28: Come to the people’s University of Orange to celebrate this new edition of Homeboy Came to Orange. The program will feature urbanists and a dance performance.
“Only the people can be entrusted with their own future.”
~ Ernie Thompson, 1971

Talking about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

WDET Detroit Today Podcast

Author Mindy Fullilove approaches the perception that race is a biological circumstance instead of a cultural construct in this new WDET Detroit Today interview with Stephen Henderson: How Fundamental Is Race to Our Understanding of Ourselves and Our Politics? The podcast explores the concept of race, where it comes from, and what it has done to America in an attempt to fully understand and realize Dr. King’s dream.

More in the April 2018 newsletter

February 2018 Newsletter

Friday, March 2nd, 2018 7:08 pm

NYU Press partners with New Village Press

New Village is delighted to announce our new partnership with NYU Press for distributed sales and marketing services beginning this month. NYU Press is a perfect publishing partner for us – our interests align, and we are immensely grateful to work with and learn from such a respected press, whose scale and publishing expertise can help our books reach a wider readership, especially in the academic realm.

We also want to express our appreciation as we say goodbye to the entire staff of Consortium, our resilient trade distributor for the past 13 years. We will truly miss working with everyone on their kind and dedicated team.

Events and broadcasts for Earth City Race with author Carl Anthony

Bay Area friends, if you missed the fabulous Oakland launch last October for Carl Anthony’s new book,The Earth, the City, and the Hidden Narrative of Race, here’s another chance to hear this venerated environmental and social justice leader. Carl will present Friday, February 9th at 7pm at East Bay Booksellers (formerly known as Diesel Books). A rare opportunity to meet Carl, get inspired, ask questions, and have him sign his book for you!

Also, tune in to hear Carl Anthony on Forum with Michael Krasny, 10-11am PST, February 19th on KQED-FM Radio (88.5 MHz, San Francisco).

Chris Hedges interviews Carl Anthony on spatial apartheid and the role of race in reimagining cities, titled “Architecture as a form of oppression with Carl Anthony,” for his weekly television program — On Contact. Hedges is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, best-selling author, and former professor at Princeton University.

Sabra Moore: book review and letter to the editor

Sabre Moore’s book, Openings: A Memoir from the Women’s Art Movement, New York City 1970-1992, was a featured review in THE Magazine of Santa Fe. Reviewer Jenn Shapland comments, “Unlike most histories of white feminism, Openings details the efforts — sometimes clumsy, sometimes discriminatory, sometimes failed — to stay conscious of and to resist the many forms of violence and erasure that exist in white heteropatriarchy.” Shapland also notes, “It’s my ardent hope that, in the future, we will have more books like Moore’s to guide us, written by the other women who participated in consciousness-raising, protesting, and the many meetings that formed the women’s movements.” Thanks – we agree!

Letter to the Editor from Sabre Moore ran in the New York Times on Feb 2, in response to the article National Gallery of Art Cancels a Chuck Close Show. Moore comments, “the cultural moment has shifted,” after Close’s show had been cancelled due to sexual abuse allegations. Moore points out, “In the 1970s and ’80s when we women artists were meeting to figure out how to respond to our exclusion from equal participation in the art world, one of the questions we asked was, Why does it matter? Do we have something different to say? Forty years later, we are still at the cusp of that question.”

Programs and media featuring author Mindy Fullilove

Mindy Thompson Fullilove, MD, author of Root Shock: How Tearing Up City Neighborhoods Hurts America, and What We Can Do About It and Urban Alchemy: Restoring Joy to America’s Sorted-Out Cities, will be speaking at Design Studio for Social Intervention’s event “The Creative Force of Black History” in Roxbury, MA, on February 8th.

Dr. Fullilove’s expert opinion on gentrification in Roanoke, Virginia is featured in a recent CityLab article, “Even the Dead Could Not Stay,” a truly unique, illustrated, and informative story by Martha Park about the destruction caused by policies of urban renewal.

Dr. Fullilove was a featured presenter in the 22nd Annual UCLA Health Care Symposium on January 27, that focused on gentrification. She noted, “if we want to better manage health, we don’t need better hospitals. We need a better society.” Fullilove explained how the displacement of people of color from their homes leads to severe health problems. “We have been systematically sacking cities. In particular, the communities of poor people,” and pointed to “the real estate industry hand in destroying public housing.”

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